2016 Changes To The Laws Regulating Threshold Real Estate Brokers

DeAnn Flores Chase

2016 Changes To The Laws Regulating Threshold Real Estate Brokers

Many California state laws are revised or amended each year. It's never too late to review some of the changes going forward as we approach the end of the year. 2016 saw a multitude of federal and state laws that affect the sale of real estate, as well as the agents and brokers thereof. Senate Bill 647, codified as California Business and Professions Code §§ 10232.3, 10232.45 and 10238 respectively, became effective January 1, 2016. This law makes various changes to the rules governing threshold brokers including: adding a category of properties they are permitted to solicit; changing the timing... READ MORE

Data Breach Risk Management For Business Owners

Today's article covers the relevant federal and state laws regarding the collection and sharing of personal information, as well as the notification requirements when data breaches occur in a public or private workplace. Federal Law The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (the "Act") requires qualifying financial institutions to explain their information-sharing practices to their customers and to safeguard sensitive data. The FTC Safeguards Rule under the Act requires financial institutions under FTC jurisdiction to have measures in place to keep customer information secure. Disclaiming guaranteed protection of customers’ information is not an acceptable measure, and therefore not a defense.  Qualifying businesses have a... READ MORE

St. John’s Holdings, LLC v. Two Electronics, LLC: A Text Message Can Form A Binding Contract

Emails and text messages are the 21st Century's preferred forms of communication. This is especially true in the real estate industry where buyers and sellers network and communicate with their brokers and agents around the clock, striving to close the perfect deal. To what extent may parties to a real estate transaction, or to any transaction for that matter, actually consummate and close a deal through emails and text messages? In what seems like a landmark case, a Massachusetts court found that text messages between two parties may form a binding, legal contract, even despite no formal offer ever being... READ MORE

About AB 1727: The California 1099 Self-Organizing Act

About ten percent, or 1.9 million, of California's 19 million person workforce consists of independent contractors. Non-union workers reportedly earn 20% less than their union counterparts in the current gig economy. Classifying workers as independent contractors has severe consequences for such workers, as non-employees generally have no statutory right to minimum wage, overtime pay, compensation for on-the-job injuries, unemployment insurance for involuntarily leaving employment, or protection against other illegal employer activities like discrimination. In the winter of 2016, a California Assemblywoman, Lorena Gonzalez, introduced AB 1727 aka The California 1099 Self-Organizing Act, an amendment to California's Labor Code. Gonzalez' intention... READ MORE

Employers Must Comply With New FLSA Salary Thresholds

California employers must be prepared to implement . Effective December 1, 2016, businesses that employ any employee earning an annual salary under $47,476 must re-assess and evaluate these new federal wage requirements affecting employee compensation. The FLSA's two-part compensation and duties test for exemption has not been changed by the new regulations. Instead, the minimum amount of salary required to qualify for the exemption has been revised. The final rule issued by the DOL increases the income threshold for employers to $913 a week, which is $47,476 annually. This new threshold is more than twice the current minimum salary. Under... READ MORE

Can Coke Trademark The Name “Zero”?

Although Coca-Cola was granted its requested relief in May of 2016 by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, winning the right to trademark the term "zero" for its beverage products, other soft drink companies, including Dr Pepper Snapple Group, were allowed by the panel to trademark the term "zero" as well. Because the Coca-Cola "zero" brands had "acquired distinctiveness" and fit as "substantially exclusive," the trademark was allowed. According to the panel, Dr Pepper, who challenged the trademark almost ten years ago, wasn't able to prove that "zero" is a generic term that could not be legally trademarked. The panel... READ MORE

Latest On Password Sharing From The Ninth Circuit

The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), 18 U.S.C. § 1030, was enacted by Congress in 1986 as an amendment to the Counterfeit Access Device and Abuse Act. While the CFAA is primarily a criminal law, an amendment in 1994 allows civil actions to be brought under the statute. While the CFAA has been amended many times in attempts to make it successfully evolve with the needs of computer users, rulings in two recent Ninth Circuit cases leave many other questions unanswered about the proper interpretation of the law, opening the door for more uncertain litigation, and perhaps the prosecution of individuals that... READ MORE